Hurricane Season

Stock-Up Checklist For Your Hurricane Survival Kit

Stock-Up Checklist For Your Hurricane Survival Kit

STOCK-UP CHECKLIST:

START GATHERING THESE ITEMS FOR YOUR HURRICANESURVIVAL KIT.

FOOD AND WATER:

***Stock a 3-day supply for each family member including pets. Store in sealed unbreakable containers. Identify the expiration date and replace every six months.

  • Bottled water (3 gal per person/ per day) Don’t forget water for animals, too
  • Water purification tablets (order over the Internet at www.quakekare.com)
  • Non-perishable foods
  • High-energy packaged foods (peanut butter, crackers, nuts, raisins & dried fruits, snacks, cookies, etc.)
  • Shelf-packaged juices (cans or cartons)
  • Canned, prepared meats
  • Canned, prepared foods
  • Baby food/formula
  • Pet food (Note: Most shelters do not allow pets)
  • Powdered or canned evaporated milk
  • Special dietary needs
  • Toilet paper & moist towelettes
  • Sponges & paper towels
  • Soap, shampoo, other misc.
  • Toiletries (toothbrushes, toothpaste, deodorant)
  • Baby Diapers and wet wipes

GEAR:

  • At least one change of clothing for each person
  • Rain gear (ponchos, umbrellas, boots, etc.)
  • Blankets, sleeping bags, pillows
  • Flashlights (1 per person w/1 extra package of batteries each)
  • Battery-powered radio, with extra batteries
  • Alarm clock (wind-up or battery operated)
  • Portable cooler/ice chest
  • Bleach (pure, unscented liquid)
  • Can opener (hand-operated) & utility knife
  • Pots, pans and cooking spoons
  • Disposable plates, cups, utensils
  • Sterno cans
  • Butane lighters & waterproof matches (in plastic bags)
  • Portable barbeque grill or camp stove
  • Charcoal and lighter fluid or stove fuel
  • Pet carriers, bowls, leashes, chain and stake
  • Plastic grocery bags (as many as you can save-you’ll use them for everything)

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS:

  • Driver’s license (for each person or photo ID)
  • Important phone numbers (updated address book)
  • Home video tape or photos for insurance
  • Extra set of car keys
  • List of important family information (i.e., serial numbers of medical devices such as pacemakers,etc.)

HEALTH NEEDS:

  • Prescription medicine (2-week supply)
  • Doctor and pharmacy
  • contact information
  • Medical paperwork, including insurance cards a copy of prescriptions and a list of allergies.
  • Pain relief and anti-diarrhea medications.
  • Vitamins
  • First Aid Kit
  • Sun screen
  • Insect repellant
  • Feminine hygiene products and birth control

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS CHECKLIST

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS CHECKLIST

BE PREPARED TO:

  1. SAFEGUARD COMPANY RECORDS AND IMPORTANT PAPERS
  2. Make duplicates to take with you, to overnight express to a branch office, or to put in a bank.
  3. Move all records away from windows, preferably into a room without any windows.
  4. If you are on the first floor, place valuable papers, records, files, etc. one to two feet off thefloor (in case of flooding)
  1. If possible, cover with large plastic bags or vinyl sheeting for additional security.
  2. DISCONNECT ALL ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES AND EQUIPMENT
  3. Backup, shutdown and unplug computers. Take backup discs with you, or overnight express to a branch office or put in the bank.
  1. Unplug copies, FAX machines, coffee pots, microwaves, and all other electric or electronic equipment to prevent damage due to power surges, blown transformers, etc.
  1. Clean out refrigerators, including ice makers or freezer compartments. Take all food to the building dumpster. DO NOT leave food in wastebaskets or any part of your office.
  1. CLEAR OFF THE TOPS OF DESKS, TABLES, FILE CABINETS, ETC.
  2. Put papers, pens, pencils, calculators, and ALL items on the tops of desks and other furniture in drawers, closets or some other place where they will not be blown away in case a window breaks. Remember even a small plant can become a projectile in hurricane force winds!
  1. Computers, terminals, keyboards, etc. should be stored in a room with no windows, if possible. Remember to close and latch the door after you store your valuables.
  1. LOWER ALL BLINDS AND CLOSE THEM
  2. Lower all blinds or close verticals. Put slats in the closed position. DO NOT TAPE

WINDOWS.

  1. If possible, put folded towels inside the bottom of any doors you may have which go to balconies, or the building exterior.
  1. Make sure all interior doors are closed TIGHT. Make sure doors leading to balconies (if applicable) are closed TIGHT and LOCKED!
  1. MAKE SURE ALL EMPLOYEES LEAVE
  2. Check your Company policy and clarify with your employees their status DURING AND AFTER the storm.
  1. Who will be the substitute supervisor (if needed); who do they call (including two alternatives) after the storm in case your business phone lines are not in operation, etc.
  1. Make sure everyone leaves as quickly as the office is secured. Appoint one person to check the office to make sure EVERY employee has safely left the building.
  1. TURN OFF ALL LIGHTS. LOCK THE DOOR(S) TO YOUR SUITE. LEAVE THE BUILDING. REMEMBER THAT BUILDING PERSONNEL WILL BE BUSY WITH THEIR OWN DUTIES SHUTTING DOWN THE BUILDING, AND WILL NOT BE AVAILABLE TO HELP YOU IN ANY WAY. YOU MUST BE PREPARED TO CLOSE YOUR OFFICE WITHOUT THEIR HELP

How To Trim Large Tree Branches

How To Trim Large Tree Branches

By: Julie Day


Nicely healed (and healing) pruning wounds.

If you’re trimming heavy tree limbs, you have to be extra careful not to damage the bark or interfere with the tree’s natural healing response. Doing it right is actually no more difficult than doing it wrong, particularly if you think ahead to how much work it would take to remove a dead tree!

Here’s how to cut large tree limbs in your yard in three simple steps.


Poorly healed wound due to an improper pruning cut.

How Trees Heal

The truth is, trees don’t actually heal like we do. When you cut off a tree branch, the tree forms a special callous tissue (like a scar) that covers over the wound to keep out disease and decay. That scarred part of the tree will be there forever, sealed off so that the rest of the tree can keep growing. It’s very important to prune trees correctly so that we don’t interfere with this process – incorrect pruning will leave the tree weak and vulnerable to disease.

In the top photo, you can see the evidence of several large pruning cuts. The bumps show well healed pruning scars, most of them completely covered over. The “donut” shaped scar is normal, too. The callous tissue grows from the outside edges toward the center, so it’s still in the process of sealing over.


Take the time to do it right.

How to Cut a Tree Limb

Proper pruning of large tree limbs involves three cuts:

    • Cut #1, Notch Cut: Cut a small notch in the bottom of the limb, 2-3 feet away from the trunk, and about a quarter of the way through. This notch will keep the bark from splitting when you make the next cut.
    • Cut #2, Relief Cut: Just outside the notch, make a relief cut completely through the branch. This removes the weight of the branch, so that you can make your final cut without the branch splitting and falling.
  • Cut #3, Final Cut: This is the one that matters! Your final cut should be right where the branch collar (that swollen bump) transitions to smooth branch bark. Follow the slant of the branch collar. If you can’t fit your saw into the crotch at the right angle, then cut it from the bottom up.

Common Tree Trimming Mistakes

    • Cutting the Branch Too Short: We used to think that branches should be cut off flush with the trunk – boy, were we ever wrong! The branch collar is responsible for forming the scar tissue. If you cut into the branch collar, the tree will have a very hard time recovering. When you see rotten holes in tree trunks, or seeping wounds, you’re looking at the aftermath of cutting off the branch collar.

    • Leaving the Branch Too Long: The branch collar on the truck can only do its job of allowing the wound to heal if all of the branch that it has to cover over has been removed while leaving the branch collar itself intact. In the photo on the right, you can see how the branch stubs that were left too long are interfering with and actually preventing the healing process from taking place.

  • Failure to Make the Relief Cuts: If you fail to make the relief cuts and remove most of the weight of the limb before trimming the branch back to the trunk, you run the risk of having the branch split off. This can cause substantial damage to the trunk, as seen in the photo at right. This can make the wound on the trunk susceptible to disease and insect infestation and take much longer to heal.

Thunderstorms & Lightning | Ready.gov

All thunderstorms are dangerous. Every thunderstorm produces lightning. While lightning fatalities have decreased over the past 30 years, lightning continues to be one of the top three storm-related killers in the United States. In 2010 there were 29 fatalities and 182 injuries from lightning. Although most lightning victims survive, people struck by lightning often report a variety of long-term, debilitating symptoms.

Other associated dangers of thunderstorms include tornadoes, strong winds, hail and flash flooding. Flash flooding is responsible for more fatalities – more than 140 annually – than any other thunderstorm-associated hazard. Dry thunderstorms that do not produce rain that reaches the ground are most prevalent in the western United States. Falling raindrops evaporate, but lightning can still reach the ground and can start wildfires.

To prepare for a thunderstorm, you should do the following:

  • Remove dead or rotting trees and branches that could fall and cause injury or damage during a severe thunderstorm.
  • Postpone outdoor activities.
  • Remember the 30/30 Lightning Safety Rule: Go indoors if, after seeing lightning, you cannot count to 30 before hearing thunder. Stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder.
  • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.
  • Get inside a home, building, or hard top automobile (not a convertible). Although you may be injured if lightning strikes your car, you are much safer inside a vehicle than outside.
  • Remember, rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide NO protection from lightning. However, the steel frame of a hard-topped vehicle provides increased protection if you are not touching metal.
  • Shutter windows and secure outside doors. If shutters are not available, close window blinds, shades or curtains.
  • Unplug any electronic equipment well before the storm arrives.

Thunderstorms & Lightning | Ready.gov.


Hurricane Preparedness Checklists for Homes

Hurricane Preparedness Tips for Home

Hurricanes can be dangerous, listening to the hurricane warning messages and planning ahead can reduce the chances of injury or major property damage.

BEFORE

Know your Emergency Shelters

Contact the National Disaster Office for the closest shelters.

Have disaster supplies on hand

Flashlight and extra batteries

Portable, battery-operated radio and extra batteries

First aid kit

Non-perishable (canned food) and water

Non-electric can opener

Essential medicines

Cash and credit cards

Sturdy shoes

Protect your windows

Permanent shutters are the best protection. A lower-cost approach is to put up plywood panels. Use 1/2 inch plywood–marine plywood is best–cut to fit each window. Remember to mark which board fits which window. Pre-drill holes every 18 inches for screws. Do this long before the storm.

Trim back branches from trees

Trim branches away from your home and cut all dead or weak branches on any trees on your property.

Check into your Home and Auto Insurance

Confirm that policies are valid and coverage is appropriate.

Make arrangements for pets and livestock

Pets may not be allowed into emergency shelters for health and space reasons. Contact your local humane society for information on animal shelters.

Develop an emergency communication plan

Make sure that all family members know what to do. Teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water. Teach children how and when to call police or fire department and which radio station to tune to for emergency information. In case family members are separated from one another during a disaster (a real possibility during the day when adults are at work and children are at school), have a plan for getting back together.

Hurricane Watches and Warnings

A hurricane watch is issued when there is a threat of hurricane conditions within 24-36 hours. A hurricane warning is issued when hurricane conditions (winds of 74 miles per hour or greater, or dangerously high water and rough seas) are expected in 24 hours or less.

DURING A HURRICANE WATCH

Listen to the radio or television for hurricane progress reports.

Check emergency supplies.

Fuel car.

Bring in outdoor objects such as lawn furniture, toys, and garden tools and anchor objects that cannot be brought inside.

Secure buildings by closing and boarding up windows.

Remove outside antennas and satellite dishes.

Turn refrigerator and freezer to coldest settings. Open only when absolutely necessary and close quickly.

Store drinking water in clean jugs, bottles, and cooking utensils.

DURING A HURRICANE WARNING

If you need to evacuate your home, lock up home and go to the nearest shelter.

Take blankets and sleeping bags to shelter.

Listen constantly to a radio or television for official instructions.

Store valuables and personal papers in a waterproof container on the highest level of your home.

Stay inside, away from windows, skylights, and glass doors.

Keep a supply of flashlights and extra batteries handy. Avoid open flames, such as candles and kerosene lamps, as a source of light.

If power is lost, turn off major appliances to reduce power “surge” when electricity is restored.

via Hurricane Preparedness Checklists for Homes.


Hurricane Survival Kit

Hurricane Survival Kit

by Dr. Rick Knabb

Essential Items

During a hurricane, and possibly for days or even weeks afterward, electricity and other utilities might not be available. Debris and/or water might block the roads, preventing vehicles from getting in our out of your neighborhood. Help might not reach you for days after the hurricane, so you’ll need to be completely self-sufficient during that period.

Here are some of the most critical supplies to have on hand, well before a hurricane threatens:

  • At least a 3-day and preferably a 7-day supply of water (one gallon per person per day)
  • Non-perishable food
  • Formula, diapers, and other baby supplies
  • Manual can opener
  • First aid kit
  • Prescription and non-prescription medicines
  • Toiletries
  • Cell phones and battery-powered cell phone chargers
  • Battery-powered radios and flashlights
  • Plenty of batteries
  • Extra cash
  • Blankets, sleeping bags, books, and games (especially if evacuating)

via Hurricane Survival Kit.