Local News

Charles Murphy News 8/11

News Cast for August 11th:

Spencer

Spencer

Spivey

Spivey

McBride

McBride

Hardy

Hardy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Authorities moved quickly Friday to arrest three suspects in connection with the murder of 39 year old Will Curry in Douglas Park. The motive for the shooting appeared to be robbery of cocaine, crack, molly, marijuana and cash at Nab’s Apartments on North East 13th Avenue. There apparently was an exchange of gunfire with the suspects themselves hospitalized at Highlands Regional.

Charged are the alleged killer, 25 year old Travis Spencer, and 22 year old Terrance Spivey, who face charges of first degree murder, armed burglary and robbery.

38 year old Latisha McBride was charged with accessory after the fact for allegedly driving the two men to the hospital for treatment.

Authorities also arrested 69 year old Curtis Hardy after a search of a residence on North West 35th Drive, and seized a 357 revolver, possibly connected to this shooting.

Arrest Reports for Will Curry Case involving Spivey, Hardy, McBride and Spencer.

In the courts, 39 year old Tracy Lynn Sparks was sentenced to one year probation for petit theft. She was originally charged with the theft of 3 hundred hydrocodone pain pills from CVS pharmacy where she worked as a pharmacy tech. She was not convicted of the crime.

33 year old Nathan Krick received one year probation for battery for an altercation in a nightclub parking lot last fall that resulted in two men being hospitalized and also the filing of a civil suit against the business.

Lovers of Florida history can catch Florida frontiers short stories this weekend, they have put on seven productions and the latest is mosquitos, alligators and determination. Dramas will depict Ponce De Leon’s discovery of Florida, St. Joseph, the wickedest city in America, the legend of Jacob Summerlin, the unexpected hurricane of 1928 that devastated our area, and the Bok Tower Gardens.

Johnny Slone

Johnny Slone

Director Lady Gail Ryan says they consult with multiple historians to try and depict an accurate portrayal of these events.

The event takes place at the Library of Florida history in Cocoa, Friday night, and Saturday and Sunday afternoons, August 15th thru 17th.

Slone johnny complaint

slone johnny warrant

Slone Arrest Affidavit

Sports Cast for August 11th:

The Okeechobee Wildcats held a successful jamboree on Saturday as teams from Pahokee, Belle Glade, Indiantown, and Ft Pierce visited for short games to start the Tri County Youth Athletic league football season.

The Okeechobee 9-10 year old team lost to Pahokee 12-0.

The 7 and 8 year old team tied Pahokee 6-6 in a competitive battle. The Wildcats will also field an 11 and 12 year old team this year.

Fernando Perez was named the most improved player for the Brahman boys’ soccer team this past season.

He made a name for himself in goal as he allowed just 1 point 04 goals per game this past year.

Perez said he appreciated the award. Perez said his first year in goal was tough and he learned from it, and that is what made him a better goal keeper this past season. Perez predicts another strong season for boys’ soccer at Okeechobee high school.


First of Fifty Five (55) Bodies Identified Through DNA to be Returned to Family

Dozier School for Boys:  First of Fifty Five (55) Bodies Identified Through DNA to be Returned to Family, Forensic Investigators Given One Year Land Use Authorization to Look for More Bodies of Children at Dozier

August 8, 2014

Panama City, Florida

By: Kevin Earl Wood, allunited@bellsouth.net

BayCommunityNews.com

On Thursday, August 7, 2014, University of South Florida (USF) forensic investigators held a press conference in Tampa, Florida, announcing recent “significant” results about the continuing investigation at the now closed Dozier School for Boys located in the North Florida Panhandle town of Marianna north of Panama City,

It was first announced by USF at the Tampa conference that ongoing DNA testing by the University of North Texas on DNA samples provided to them by USF from the remains of 55 bodies, almost all of which are believed to be children who were sent to Dozier, has now identified one 14-year old child whose family had been seeking the remains of their child for decades with no luck getting Dozier officials to admit truthfully where the body was located.

The child, George Owen Smith was sent to Dozier in 1940 never to be seen alive by his family again.

According to USF press office officer Lara Wade, “Smith, whose body was found in a hastily-buried grave wrapped only in a burial shroud, was positively matched with DNA collected from his sister, Ovell Krell of Polk County…The positive identification was made through a DNA sample collected from Krell and matched at the University of North Texas Health Science Center, which had extracted DNA from a skeletal analysis. The DNA matching services are supported by the Office of Justice Programs at the National Institute of Justice.”

Ms. Wade continues, “Smith had been sent to Dozier in 1940. His mother, Frances Smith wrote to the school’s superintendent, Millard Davidson in December of 1940 asking about her son only to receive a letter back saying no one knew where he was.

In January 1941, his family was told he was found dead under a house after escaping from the school. The family traveled to Marianna to claim his body, but when they arrived were led to a freshly-covered grave with no marker.  Krell has said her mother never accepted that her son was dead and spent the last decades of her life waiting for him to return home.”

“We may never know the full circumstances of what happened to Owen or why his case was handled the way it was,” said Erin Kimmerle, the lead researcher in the project and an associate professor of anthropology at USF. “But we do know that he now will be buried under his own name and beside family members who longed for answers.

“After all these years, this child will be afforded dignity that is every human being’s right – the right to be buried under their own name and to have their existence recognized.”

Smith was a white male whose remains were buried on the north side of Dozier at a burial ground for children known as “Boot Hill.”  The Dozier campus, opened in 1900, had been segregated for decades where black and white children were housed separately.  Because of the historical practice of burying black and white persons in separate grave yards it is believed that Boot Hill was the black burial ground at Dozier.  The unmarked graves at Boot Hill have no headstones to identify who is buried in each grave.

USF believes based on witness testimony and documentary evidence that other burials of white children may exist on the south, white, side of Dozier and USF has been continuing to search the numerous acres of the school for other gravesites and children.

USF had received a “land use” permit that expired in August 2014 allowing the investigation and exhumations of the children at Dozier.  The permit was issued by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) after approval last year by Governor Rick Scott and his Florida Cabinet members.  USF announced yesterday that the Cabinet and DEP are going to extend the permit for another year until August 2015 to continue to look for, and exhume, more bodies.

An organization known as the “White House Boys” has organized over the last several years to to “expose the truth” of Dozier.

The organization consists not only of now elderly Dozier survivors, but their surviving families.  Many of the White House Boys have since died while waiting for the truth and justice from the State of Florida.

The leader of the organization, Jerry Cooper, now approaching 70-years old, is himself a survivor of Dozier who has led the effort to get the state and USF to do the investigation and exhumations at Dozier to return the children’s remains to families who wish to bury their children in cemeteries of their families and loved one.  Forensic analysis of the remains may also reveal insight into how these children died bringing clarity to what really happened at Dozier.

The term “White House” refers to a small white building on the south, white, side of Dozier where numerous survivors have testified that they were taken there to be beaten unmercifully with a long leather strap with a wooden handle until blood flowed, and tissue was torn, from the backs of these children who were forced by Dozier guards to lay face down on a jail cell mattress, hold on the head rail of the bed, and dared not to move or the beatings would start all over.

This reporter has been inside the White House during a visit by Senator Nelson to Dozier and felt the same terror that these children must have felt when they entered the jail knowing, and waiting for, the beatings they were about to receive.  The building has jail cells with bars on the doors to each cell exactly as you would see in an adult jail facility.

Cooper maintains that there was “criminal negligence” at Dozier and by state officials not only to allow or cause these deaths, but to cover up the location of the bodies of these children so that families could not find them by not documenting where children were buried and not placing identifying markers on the graves to tell what child was buried where.

Cooper has now met with and convinced authorities to investigate the deaths of children at a similar juvenile detention facility in Okeechobee, Florida, and to search for more graves.  The Okeechobee Sheriff’s Office supported by their State Attorney has now recently opened an official investigation into the Okeechobee facility that is pending.  Many Dozier children had been transferred to Okeechobee according to Cooper where it is alleged that similar abuses continue.

“Additionally, researchers will continue to search for victims of a 1914 fire at the school which is believed to have killed 10 boys. During their excavation of the unmarked burial ground known as Boot Hill, the researchers found evidence of burned remains but did not locate all of the presumed victims of the 1914 fire”, according Lara Wade.

Ms. Wade concluded, “DNA continues to be collected by the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office.  All sets of remains recovered from the Dozier site have been sent to UNTHSC (University of North Texas), where there are currently 9 viable family reference samples for comparison. Over the next year, efforts will be focused on also trying to locate additional families.  Each set of remains has now been assigned a unique identification number so that in the event family members come forward in the future, a match can still be made.”

The question remains that if some, or all, of the DNA of the remaining 54 exhumed bodies does not make a match with the DNA provided by the families, where are these children buried?

According to U.S. Senator Bill Nelson,“USF and Dr. Kimmerle have done a heroic job in helping bring closure to the families for their loved ones of what happened up at the Dozier school.  …  And we’re not going to let this problem be ignored anymore. Thanks to USF, we are bringing this in for understanding and not letting this problem be ignored.  And it’s important – it’s important for justice and it’s important for the loved ones of those missing.”

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, a Cabinet member, added, “I am proud to continue to support the University of South Florida’s important research to find answers to the many questions surrounding the deaths that occurred at Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, and I congratulate them on their work and findings. I will continue to provide whatever support I can as they move forward with their efforts.”

Not all folk in Marianna are pleased with the findings and the extension of the investigation.  Some in Marianna claim the publicity about Dozier has tarnished the reputation of Marianna.  Dale Cox of Marianna has tried continuously to stop the investigation and exhumations.  At one point Cox even attempted to file criminal charges against USF and Dr. Kimmerle.  State Attorney Glenn Hess, Panama City, Florida, rejected the criminal complaint.


Health science center team IDs remains from Florida reformatory

Health science center team IDs remains from Florida reformatory

FORT WORTH — A set of remains found at a Florida reform school, described by one former student as a “place of pure horror,” has been identified by scientists at the UNT Health Science Center as a 14-year-old boy who was sent to the school in 1940.

The remains of George Owen Smith were positively matched with DNA collected from his sister, Ovell Krell, 86, of Polk County, Fla.

His are the first identified among the 55 sets of remains recovered between September and December from the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys, which closed in 2011 for budgetary reasons — and under a cloud of allegations of physical and sexual abuse.

Scientists were not able to determine the cause of death for the boy, who went by the name Owen.

“These are some of the most degraded remains we’ve seen here,” Dixie Peters, technical leader for the missing persons team, said at a news conference Thursday at the Fort Worth-based center.

The 73-year-old case is one of the oldest positive identifications made by the Center for Human Identification at the University of North Texas Health Science Center.

The job of identifying the remains was handed over to scientists at the center in December. Bones and teeth from the remains were sent over in three batches, and testing is either complete or being completed on each set, Peters said.

Most of the remains sent to the center have been teeth and bone fragments from the 1930s to the 1950s, Peters said. The remains are ground up and tested for nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. In Owen’s case, the remains were so fragmented that researchers had to rely on mitochondrial DNA to confirm the match.

Scientists at the health science center are working with researchers at the University of South Florida on the project, which is funded by the Florida Legislature and the National Institute of Justice and also involves the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, a database managed at the health science center. NamUs is helping investigators try to find relatives who may searching for missing loved ones who were sent to the school, Peters said.

So far, 11 families have come forward, Peters said.

“The linchpin has been getting reference samples from families,” Peters said. “If we don’t get more families we will not make additional associations.”

‘Not an easy road’

Smith was sent to the reform school, then called the Florida Industrial School for Boys, for being with a friend in a stolen car, and in December 1940 his mother wrote to the school’s superintendent, asking about her son. She received a letter back saying that no one knew where he was. One month later the family was told that Smith had been found dead under a house after escaping from the school.

The family traveled to the school in Marianna, Fla., to collect Smith’s remains, but when they arrived they were told that he had been buried in an unmarked grave.

At a news conference Thursday in Tampa, researchers at South Florida said that Owen’s body had been found in a two-foot grave, lying on his side with his hands over his head.

He will soon be reburied next to his mother and father in Auburndale, Fla.

“This is what we worked for,” Krell, Owen’s sister, said at the news conference. “It was not an easy road.”

Krell said her older brother would wear a guitar string around his neck and that the family would sing country-western songs for entertainment. He hadn’t been in trouble before the stolen car, she said.

Over the years, the family kept his wallet.

“It was important to him and I often wondered why he left it,” Krell said.

‘Lot of boys missing’

Records say that there were 31 burials at the school between 1900 and 2011, but researchers found 24 more bodies during last year’s excavation project.

Some former students from the 1950s and 1960s have accused school employees and guards at the closed reform school of physical and sexual abuse. But the Florida Department of Law Enforcement concluded after an investigation that it could not substantiate or dispute the claims.

Jerry Cooper, president of a group of about 300 men called the “White House Boys” who say they were tortured at the school as children, said that only a small fraction of the 1,400-acre campus has been searched.

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Florida Cabinet extended the permit this week for research work to continue on the Dozier site until Aug. 5, 2015. The research was previously scheduled to end this month, Cooper said.

Cooper, 69, said he came to the school at age 15 after he ran away from home three times. He was released in 1961.

Cooper said he counted 135 lashes the first time he was beaten. The beating left his body in tatters and ended with him picking bits of torn clothing from his wounds, Cooper said.

“It was a place of pure horror,” Cooper said. “We have a lot of boys missing. We have records for 180 boys who were there and no one knows what happened to them. A lot of people believe there are more cemeteries. Will they ever find all the bodies? I don’t know. I’m only hoping that we don’t go down as a mystery.”

A leader in DNA processing

The UNT Health Science Center is one of only a few public-sector laboratories that specialize in the analysis of mitochondrial DNA, or mtDNA, from skeletal remains. This DNA is more resistant to degradation than is nuclear DNA, which is routinely analyzed in forensic cases.

Since 2003, the center has processed more than 5,200 sets of human remains, making more than 1,100 DNA associations that led to identifications.

The health science center also has the nation’s only lab at an academic center that is approved to upload genetic data for unidentified remains to the FBI’s Combined DNA Index System, or CODIS. The lab has been crucial in helping identify victims of well-known crimes and natural disasters.

Workers identified a victim of Chicago serial killer John Wayne Gacy and worked on cases involving Gary Ridgway, a Seattle-area murderer known as the Green River Killer. The center has also helped identify victims of t9-11, Hurricane Katrina and the 1973 Pinochet military coup in Chile.

This report includes material from The Associated Press and the Star-Telegram archives.

Mitch Mitchell, 817-390-7752 Twitter: @mitchmitchel3


Henry Creek Lock to Receive Updated Manatee Protection System

Henry Creek Lock to Receive Updated Manatee Protection System

The navigation lock is scheduled to reopen to boat traffic August 25

Okeechobee, FL —The Henry Creek Navigation Lock, or G-36, on the north shore of Lake Okeechobee is scheduled to close to boat traffic beginning August 11 to install an upgraded manatee protection system.

As one of the first of 19 SFWMD gates and locks to receive the unique system in the 1990s to protect this endangered and iconic Florida species, it was time to replace parts at the end of their useful life.

Developed by Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute at Florida Atlantic University, the system uses sensors at the bottom of the lock that prevent gates from closing when a manatee is present.

Work is scheduled to be complete and the lock reopened to boaters by Friday, August 22.

For information about the lock and manatee protection system, please contact Gary Ritter at (863) 462-5260, ext. 3017, or gritter@sfwmd.gov


No change to target flows east and west from Lake Okeechobee

No change to target flows east and west from Lake Okeechobee

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District has announced it will continue the target flows it set in mid-July as it continues to manage water levels at Lake Okeechobee.

For the Caloosahatchee Estuary, the target flow remains at a 10-day average of 1,500 cubic feet per second (cfs) as measured at W.P. Franklin Lock and Dam (S-79) near Fort Myers.  Local basin runoff will continue to be allowed to pass through Franklin as necessary, which could cause flows to exceed the target.

The target flow for the St. Lucie Lock and Dam (S-80) is unchanged at 0 cfs, although local basin runoff from the St. Lucie Canal (C-44) will continue to be allowed to pass through the St. Lucie Lock as has been the case since early June.

“The lake has been rising in recent days,” said Lt. Col. Tom Greco, Jacksonville District Deputy Commander for South Florida. “We are working with the South Florida Water Management District to keep lakes in the Kissimmee chain near the top of their regulation schedules.  We are also seeing success in sending lake water through the southern outlets on the lake.  On Wednesday (Aug 6), 900 cfs was sent to the south while no lake water was sent to the Caloosahatchee River or St. Lucie Canal.”

Today, the lake stage is 14.20 feet, and has risen 0.26 feet in the past week.  It is currently in the Operational Low Sub-Band of the Corps’ water control plan, the 2008 Lake Okeechobee Regulation Schedule (LORS).   In the Low Sub-Band, under current conditions, LORS authorizes the Corps to discharge up to 3,000 cfs to the Caloosahatchee and up to 1,170 cfs to the St. Lucie.

“If the lake continues to rise, there is a possibility discharges will have to be increased,” said Greco.  “We will continue to monitor conditions and make adjustments as necessary based on LORS guidance.”

For information on water level and flows data for Lake Okeechobee, visit the water management website page at http://www.saj.usace.army.mil/Missions/CivilWorks/WaterManagement.aspx.


Charles Murphy News 8/8

News Cast for August 8th:

Ammi Leon, 26, charged with escape, resisting arrest and battery on the highway patrol

Ammi Leon, 26, charged with escape, resisting arrest and battery on the highway patrol

Among arrests, 31 year old Danny Lovejoy of Kenansville was charged with felony battery, grand theft auto, burglary to a vehicle, tampering with evidence and petit theft after an alleged domestic quarrel in a residence near Lake Marion.   The victim suffered a broken nose and her purse and cell phone were stolen.

26 Ammi Leon of Key West was charged with felony battery, resisting arrest and escape after a reported struggle with Florida highway patrolmen at the Fort Drum service plaza Wednesday evening.

Leon Arrest Report

The owners of a local salvage yard went to federal court suing the Sheriff and two of his detectives for alleged violations of their 4th and 14th amendments. The couple was jailed on dealing in stolen property charges for allegedly purchasing a forklift and trailer and later selling it rather than scraping it. Those charges were later dropped. Attorney Jason Wandner says Florida law exempts criminal prosecution from 2nd hand recyclers that follow the law. He was asked what damages they are seeking, no monetary amount is set. A trial date was set for November 17th before Judge Jose Martinez. The person who stole the fork lift is facing charges in St. Lucie County.

Okeechobee cowboy Nat Stratton made it all the way to the College National finals in Casper Wyoming this year competing in the bronco riding event. Stratton has attended Panhandle State University in Oklahoma for the past two years. Two of his teammates won national championships this year.

He said that gives him confidence that he too could get a championship. Stratton is studying agri-science and would like to be a full time member of the professional rodeo circuit association after graduation; he competes all summer long in rodeos in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and other states.

Sports Cast for August 8th:

Yearling soccer coach Erick Rios has put together one of the best middle school programs in soccer over the past 10 years.

He noted last year’s team lost their first match and then won nine straight and that was a testament to their composure and work ethic. The new season will be starting in a couple of weeks and Rios predicts the program should continue to be a success provided they get players who have some experience join the program. The Chobee Wildcat youth football team will host a jamboree tomorrow at the soccer fields across from North Elementary.

The OYFL teams travel to Vero Beach for five games tomorrow.

Lonnie Pryor and the Buccaneers are at Jacksonville tonight at 7:30 pm.


Statement by Commissioner Putnam on Today’s Announcement Regarding Research at the Dozier School for Boys

Statement by Commissioner Putnam on Today’s Announcement Regarding Research at the Dozier School for Boys

Tallahassee, FL – Following the announcement today that the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Florida Cabinet extended the permit for research at the Dozier School for Boys until Aug. 5, 2015, Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam released this statement:

“The University of South Florida has made great progress in answering a number of questions about the dark history of the Dozier School for Boys. In order to bring resolution to the community and the families, the USF researchers should quickly and thoroughly complete the work that they have begun. The victims’ families and the people of Florida deserve to have the best answers that science can provide.”

For more information about the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www.FreshFromFlorida.com.


USF Researchers Identify First Set of Unnamed Dozier Remains as George Owen Smith, 14

USF Researchers Identify First Set of Unnamed Dozier Remains as George Owen Smith, 14

Smith will be first unidentified body recovered from 55 unmarked graves to be returned to family

TAMPA, Fla. (Aug. 7, 2014) – George Owen Smith, a 14-year-old sent to the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in 1940 never to be seen alive by his family again, has been positively identified through a DNA match and will be the first remains exhumed from 55 unmarked graves by University of South Florida researchers to be returned to his family.

Smith, whose body was found in a hastily-buried grave wrapped only in a burial shroud, was positively matched with DNA collected from his sister, Ovell Krell of Polk County. Researchers are continuing to work to identify the other remains recovered from the unmarked cemetery at the former Florida reform school in Marianna.

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection along with the Florida Cabinet this week extended the permit for research work to continue on the Dozier site until Aug. 5, 2015. Researchers will look for other possible remains, piece together answers on the identities of those buried there, and work with cabinet member and Florida CFO Jeff Atwater to develop plans for the reburial of anyone unidentified.

The positive identification was made through a DNA sample collected from Krell and matched at the University of North Texas Health Science Center, which had extracted DNA from a skeletal analysis. The DNA matching services are supported by the Office of Justice Programs at the National Institute of Justice. The Dozier excavations are supported with funding by the State of Florida.

“We may never know the full circumstances of what happened to Owen or why his case was handled the way it was,” said Erin Kimmerle, the lead researcher in the project and an associate professor of anthropology at USF. “But we do know that he now will be buried under his own name and beside family members who longed for answers.

“After all these years, this child will be afforded dignity that is every human being’s right – the right to be buried under their own name and to have their existence recognized.”

Additionally, researchers will continue to search for victims of a 1914 fire at the school which is believed to have killed 10 boys. During their excavation of the unmarked burial ground known as Boot Hill, the researchers found evidence of burned remains but did not locate all of the presumed victims of the 1914 fire.

Since 2011, USF researchers have been searching for records and the identities of scores of boys buried at the school. The remains were excavated from 55 grave shafts at the site.

Researchers continue to work with UNTHSC, the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs), and the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office to locate possible next of kin to collect reference samples for identification.

The identification of Smith’s remains is an important breakthrough in the project, and for his family finally provides at least one answer to many questions that have gone unanswered for 73 years.

Smith had been sent to Dozier in 1940. His mother, Frances Smith wrote to the school’s superintendent, Millard Davidson in December of 1940 asking about her son only to receive a letter back saying no one knew where he was.

In January 1941, his family was told he was found dead under a house after escaping from the school. The family traveled to Marianna to claim his body, but when they arrived were led to a freshly-covered grave with no marker. Krell has said her mother never accepted that her son was dead and spent the last decades of her life waiting for him to return home.

DNA continues to be collected by the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office.  All sets of remains recovered from the Dozier site have been sent to UNTHSC, where there are currently 9 viable family reference samples for comparison. Over the next year, efforts will be focused on also trying to locate additional families.  Each set of remains has now been assigned a unique identification number so that in the event family members come forward in the future, a match can still be made.

The University of South Florida is a high-impact, global research university dedicated to student success. USF is a Top 50 research university among both public and private institutions nationwide in total research expenditures, according to the National Science Foundation. Serving nearly 48,000 students, the USF System has an annual budget of $1.5 billion and an annual economic impact of $4.4 billion. USF is a member of the American Athletic Conference.


Charles Murphy News 8/7

News Cast for August 7th:

In the courts sexual battery and child abuse charges were dropped against 22 year old Jerkota McNeil, who was accused on September 29th of 2013 of raping a child who had taken ecstasy at a party. They allegedly hung out at a night club in Douglas Park and went to a home in Dixie Ranch Acres where the alleged incident took place.

Superintendent of Schools Ken Kenworthy says a salary hike for employees is a distinct possibility this year.   The school board approved the tentative spending plan of 65.9 million at two public hearings in July; the final hearing is in September. Kenworthy said 35 new teachers will join the staff of approximately 6 hundred people this year. Tax rates will decline slightly for public schools this year.

Palm Beach County retired Judge Nelson Bailey was well received at July meeting of the Treasure Coast council on local governments at the Methodist Church in Okeechobee. He gave them a presentation on the areas cracker history with cattle, the Spanish exploration, and battles with Indians. He admits Florida’s rich history surprises some people.

Sports Cast for August 7th:

Javier Hernandez took home the offensive MVP award for Yearling soccer this past season leading the Bulls attack.

He said the team really exceeded expectations last year. He urged the younger players to work hard and keep up the success at Yearling. He plans to play high school soccer for the Brahmans.

The OYFL junior squad is busy getting ready for the season. Last year the team went 8-2 and Asst. Coach Marcel Richardson said there is no reason the team can’t have another strong season this year. He noted the kids have been impressive at practice. The OYFL opens their regular season this Saturday with games at Vero Beach.


The Number of Hispanics in the USA Reaches 52 million

The Number of Hispanics in the USA Reaches 52 million

The number of Spanish speakers already represents 16.3 percent of the country’s population

August 6, 2014 Waltham, MA – The United States Hispanic community continues to grow with the constant arrival of Mexicans, Cubans, and the growing families of established Hispanics already living in the USA . This constant input of Hispanics has made them the ethnic group that has grown the most in the last few decades.

The last census conducted in the United States reflects that 16.3 percent of the American population is of Latino or Hispanic origin totaling 52 million. This number is even bigger in states like New Mexico, California, Texas and Florida because of its proximity to South America reaching 46 percent in New Mexico, 38 percent in California, 36 in Texas and 22 in Florida.

The number in Florida is smaller but has a large Hispanic population and influence in major cities. Tomás P. Regalado, Mayor of the City of Miami said, “In Miami people speaks Spanish more than English.” to explain the influence of the Latino ethnic group in the city.

One of the sectors where the Spanish speaker’s presence is growing is in the soccer industry. NBC Universal has just acquired the rights to the next two World Cups, 2018 and 2022, due to the large number of Spanish speakers who expect to watch on Telemundo, the Spanish channel that will air both events.

As for players, David Villa, alongside Frank Lampard, will lead the New York City FC in its debut year in MLS and will face other Hispanic stars of their teams such as Diego Fagundez, Uruguayan star of Boston´s New England Revolutions and Argentinian Diego Valeri, from the Portland Timbers. Valeri, alongside Cuban Osvaldo Alonso and Mexican Erick Torres will be the Latino representation in the MLS All-Star Game to be held this evening at Providence Park, home of the Portland Timbers. Similar to the population ratio, the All Star game will also have around 10 percent of Latino players participating in the game.

The quality of the MLS is, in fact, increasing partly thanks to the investment made by the teams to bring soccer icons like Thierry Henry, David Villa and Frank Lampard, as well as increasing the presence of Hispanic and British players in clubs and soccer academies across the country.

In Global Premier Soccer, one of the largest soccer academy in the country, operating in 10 states, 10 Spanish-speaking coaches currently comprise part of the 70 coach staff at the headquarters of the club.

“The high quality level of coaches, along with the economic crisis increased the likelihood of the Spaniards and Hispanics to emigrate to the USA. And the ample employment opportunities for qualified coaches in the United States has caused an increase in Spaniards and South Americans working in the soccer industry across the country.” according to Jose Campos, Marketing Manager and coach at Global Premier Soccer.

About Global Premier Soccer

Global Premier Soccer is one of the largest soccer academy in the United States. Headquartered in Massachusetts with franchises in the states of Florida, Carolina, Georgia, Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.

Players like Graham Zusi or Geoff Cameron, both in the United States squad and participants of the last world cup, played for GPS when they were little.

For further information on Global Premier Soccer please contact Kevin O’Brien mail kobrien@globalpremiersoccer.com


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